This weekโ€™s reading haul.


๐Ÿ“š Read: Harrow the Ninth by Tamyn Muir.

I think this book broke my brain. It’s everything I typically don’t like, and I’m still not positive I’m sure what I read, and yet I devoured it. Rather than my confusion leading to frustration, I found it propulsive. I wanted every layer of unreliable narration on top of half-overhead statements by characters on top of non-linearity shellacked onto me as I was reshaped by reading this the way Harrowhawk can reshape her own bone.

What the fuck was that?

Please get Alecto the Ninth into my hands immediately.


๐Ÿ“š Read: The Worst of All Possible Worlds by Alex White


๐Ÿ“š Read: This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar


๐Ÿ“š Very excited to have received Incredible Doom.


๐Ÿ“š Read: Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson


๐Ÿ“šRead: Recursion by Blake Crouch


๐Ÿ“šJust started reading Recursion by Blake Crouch last night. Hell of an opening chapter.


๐Ÿ“šRead: Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennet


๐Ÿ“šRead: Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The nature of hate is mysterious. It can gnaw at the heart for an eon, then depart when one expected it to remain as immobile as a mountain. But even mountains erode.


๐Ÿ“šRead: The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

The will to be polite, to maintain civility and normalcy, is fearfully strong. I wonder sometimes how much evil is permitted to run unchecked simply because it would be rude to interrupt it.


๐Ÿ“šRead: The Rosewater Redemption by Tade Thomspon


๐Ÿ“š Read: Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett


๐Ÿ“š Read: The Mortal Word by Genevieve Cogman


๐Ÿ“š Read: The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin


๐Ÿ“šRead: State Tectonics by Malka Older


๐Ÿ“šRead: A Choir of Lies by Alexandra Rowland. Might be the best sequel Iโ€™ve ever read.


๐Ÿ“šRead: A Memory Called Empire by Arkardy Martine โ€” I really enjoyed this one, disappointed itโ€™ll be another year before the sequel is released.


๐Ÿ“š Read: The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz.

I am positive this will be one of my favorite books I read in 2020.


๐Ÿ“šRead: The Cruel Stars by John Birmingham.


๐Ÿ“šRead: Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir. At the start of this book I thought, “What is going on and what is everyone talking about?” By the end of it, I was confident it would be one of my favorites of the year.


Semiosis was one of my favorite books from last year, so I’m not surprised I really enjoyed Interference. I think I’ve got a thing for first contact books and non-human narrators, considering how much I loved Children of Time and Children of Ruin.


Even though I read more books and pages than ever before this year, my habit wasn’t exactly consistent. I basically flatlined to end the year. Let’s hope for a similar quantity next year, but more evenly distributed. Reading is a habit that I want to nurture, not a binge activity.


Just finished โ€œTo Be Taught, if Fortunateโ€ and my god is Becky Chambers a treasure.๐Ÿ“š


A Big Ship at the End of the Universe was delightfully fun SF and F mixup and I immediately bought the sequel. ๐Ÿ“š


Time travel stories have been getting better and better lately it seems. Permafrost was a good one, and it marks ๐Ÿ“š 16 for the year.


All three books in the masterful Last Policeman Trilogy for just $5.97 is a steal. ๐Ÿ“š


Spinning Silver was brilliant. At least as good as Uprooted. Wow. โญ๏ธโญ๏ธโญ๏ธโญ๏ธโญ๏ธ ๐Ÿ“š


A lot of people in my life are trying to diversify who they read. I know I’m doing poorly on reading people of color, but I felt subconsciously like I read quite a few books by women. So I decided to check the last three years of books I’ve read.

I exported my data from Goodreads as a CSV 1, hand coded the authors, and found, to my surprise, I was now reading mostly women.

A stacked bar graph with a bar per year from 2016 to 2018. It shows that I read 16 books by men and 11 by women in 2016, 10 books by men and 17 books by women in 2017, and 11 books by men and 18 by women in 2018.

I find it pretty challenging to be intentional about what I am reading. It is pretty easy for me to get out of the habit of reading if I pause for a few days– it almost always stretches to weeks if I stop reading for just three or four nights in a row. This almost always happens between books when I become paralyzed by choice and my “mood”. I am going to try and keep more authors of color “handy” though so that I can be more likely to unintentional change my balance there like I have with gender in the past couple of years.


  1. Annoyingly, I noticed that four of the books I read in the last three years did not export with a “Date Read” attribute even though it’s clearly set in the Goodreads interface. I mention that as a “buyer beware” if you want to do similar analysis on your own reading. I added those four back by hand. [return]

The more I think about it, the more I like the title Record of a Spaceborn Few.

I’m not sure any writer has just come onto the scene like Kool-Aid man blasting through a wall and knocked me over like Becky Chambers has. ๐Ÿ“š


Currently reading: The Last Mortal Bond by Brian Staveley ๐Ÿ“š


Part of me wants to walk to BookPeople right now. Then the other part of me remembers I can go to Powellโ€™s next week. ๐Ÿค”๐Ÿ“š


I donโ€™t want to wait until July for Record of a Spaceborn Few. ๐Ÿ“š


I have only read two of the Nebula nominees for best novel, which means I can add 5 more books to my “want to read” shelf on Goodreads! ๐Ÿ“š


Altered Carbon was good, but probably about 100-150 pages too long. ๐Ÿ“š

โญ๏ธโญ๏ธโญ๏ธโญ๏ธ, book 7 of the year ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿป


Missed my GoodReads challenge 2 years in a row. So I started this year by breaking one of my rules and doing a couple of rereadsโ€” The Subtle Knife & The Amber Spyglass. Hadn’t read either since they were published. Now I’m on my sixth book this year. ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿป๐Ÿ“š